TRC Ottawa National Event

Ottawa National Event Multimedia, May/June 2015

A walk to remember slideshow

An estimated 10,000 people joined the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Walk for Reconciliation. Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, led the Anglican delegation, which included representatives from various dioceses across Canada. Photos: André Forget/ Anglican Journal

Walk for Reconciliation videos

Videos taken during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Walk for Reconciliation, May 31, Ottawa.

TRC Ottawa latest news

In 2015, it has been a little child who has "moved the heart of the world, the heart of the church, the heart of each and every one of us in some way or another," notes Archbishop Fred Hiltz in his annual New Year's Day address at Christ Church Cathedral, Ottawa. Photo: Art Babych

Children deserve ‘our very best efforts,’ says Hiltz in New Year’s address

In his annual New Year's address at Christ Church Cathedral, the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, Archbishop Fred Hiltz, said the church must ensure that the interests and well-being of children, in Canada and around the world, are upheld.
TRC Chair Justice Murray Sinclair, accompanied by Commissioners Wilton Littlechild and Marie Wilson, presents a digital copy of the historic final report to the primate, Archbishop Fred Hiltz. Photo: Art Babych

New details about missing children in TRC final report

The six-year mandate of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) ended December 15 with the release of a multi-volume report that ushers in what the commissioners called a "new era in reconciliation for Canada."
Archdeacon Lynne McNaugton, of the ecclesiastical province of British Columbia, calls for the building of relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people at the local level. Photo: André Forget

Exploring the future of reconciliation in Canada

How best to continue the process of reconciliation, now that Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) has issued its final report and released its calls to action?
National Indigenous Bishop Mark MacDonald and the Rev. Ruth Kitchekeesik take part in the Walk for Reconciliation at the beginning of the final Truth and Reconciliation Commission event in Ottawa. Photo: André Forget

Indigenous bishops not invited to TRC closing ceremonies

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) has been investigating the tragic legacy of Canada's Indian residential schools for the past six years, and last Wednesday, June 3, it held its closing ceremonies at Rideau Hall in Ottawa, but two prominent Indigenous Anglicans who had come to Ottawa for the final events were not present.
(L to R) Indigenous Spiritual Ministry of Mishamikoweesh Bishop Lydia Mamakwa, National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonal, and ACIP members Sheba McKay and Ruth Kitchekesik. Photo: Marites N. Sison

TRC report will advance Indigenous self-determination in church, says bishop

National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald said he is hopeful that the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) outlining concrete actions that would respect the sovereignty and integrity of Canada's Indigenous peoples would help Indigenous Anglicans' own struggle for self-determination within the Anglican Church of Canada.
About 300 people gathered at Rideau Hall, the official home and workplace of the governor general, for the ceremony marking the end of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s work. Photo: Art Babych

As TRC ends, Johnston asks Canadians: ‘Where do we go from here?’

In a solemn ceremony marking the conclusion of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), Governor General David Johnston urged Canadians to seize a historic opportunity "to look back, and to look forward together" and to begin "a new chapter in the story of Canada and its diverse peoples."
TRC Commissioner Marie Wilson, Governor General David Johnston, vice-regal consort Sharon Johnston, TRC chair Justice Murray Sinclair, Commissioner Chief Wilton Littlechild and a number of their grandchildren plant paper hearts on Rideau Hall grounds. Photo: Art Babych

Heart garden’ puts youth at forefront of reconciliation

The first event of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) began in Winnipeg in 2010 with residential school survivors lighting a sacred fire where the Red and Assiniboine Rivers meet; the last one ended in Ottawa on June 3 with children leading the way out of Rideau Hall and into a garden of paper hearts.
Archbishop Fred Hiltz reads the ecumenical response while (L-R) Fr. Peter Bisson, the Rev. Stephen Farris, Archbishop Gérard Pettipas and the Rt. Rev. Gary Paterson look on. Photo: Art Babych

Churches promise to heed TRC’s call to action

Acknowledging that their apologies for harms done at Indian residential schools "are not enough," Anglican, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic and United church leaders on June 2 welcomed the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's (TRC) recommendations that they say will offer direction to their "continuing commitment to reconciliation" with Indigenous peoples.
(L to R) Chief Wilton Littlechild, Justice Murray Sinclair and Marie Wilson present the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s final report on Indian residential schools. Photo: Art Babych

Sinclair: The eyes of the world are on Canada

A journey of six years reached its climax on June 2 when the summary of the final report of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) was presented to a crowded audience in the Grand Ballroom of Ottawa's Delta hotel.
“We are all Treaty people who share responsibility for taking action on reconciliation,” TRC Commissioners Chief Wilton Littlechild, Marie Wilson and Justice Murray Sinclair say in their final report. Photo: Marites N. Sison

Residential schools a form of ‘cultural genocide,’ says TRC report

Addressing what it described as a "cultural genocide" inflicted for over a century on Canada's Aboriginal peoples, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) on June 2 issued 94 wide-ranging "Calls to Action," including the creation of a National Council for Reconciliation, a Royal Proclamation and Covenant on Reconciliation and an apology from the Pope for the Roman Catholic Church's role in residential schools.
Clara Fergus shares her experiences of the Brandon Indian Residential School with the help of a support worker. Photo: André Forget

For residential school survivors, impact lasts generations

"My mom and dad didn't tell us why they were putting us on the train. I thought they were coming with us," said Clara Fergus, a Cree woman from northern Manitoba to a sharing circle on the morning of June 1, at the beginning of the final event of Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC).
(L to R): Grand Chief Edward John, TRC Commissioner Wilton Littlechild, Indigenous rights activist Ellen Gabriel and Canadian Association of Statutory Human Rights Agencies President David Langtry. Photo: André Forget

UN Declaration provides ‘crucial framework’ for reconciliation

The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples provides "a crucial framework for achieving reconciliation, justice and healing in Canada for all indigenous peoples," according to Paul Joffe, a lawyer who represents the Grand Council of the Crees in international forums and who has done a lot of work on aboriginal law.
An estimated 10,000 people joined the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Walk for Reconciliation, which included representatives from various dioceses across Canada. Photo: André Forget

Key recommendations of the TRC report

In its final report, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC) issued 94 calls to action that it said would "redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation."

Inuit elder Sally Webster lights the quliq, an oil lamp traditionally used by Inuit, during the opening ceremonies of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's closing event in Ottawa. Photo: Marites N. Sison

TRC chair: Reconciliation requires commitment of all Canadians

At the conclusion of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada's (TRC) six-year work of collecting testimonies and facts around the Indian residential schools, its chair Justice Murray Sinclair urged Canadians to believe not only that healing and reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people can happen, but that "it should happen."

Walk for Reconciliation videos

Videos taken during the Truth and Reconciliation Commission's Walk for Reconciliation, May 31, Ottawa.





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