Mary and Begum

Across southern Tanzania, construction of new houses points to a general rise in the standard of living that has taken place over the past 20 years.

When Harima Mkitage’s family received a cow four years ago, her parents used some of the money the cow brought in to pay her school fees. Now, she wants to become a livestock specialist.

Harima Mkitage with the cow Liviki and her two calves.

Hasan Mkitage, Nuru Salumu and their son Jamali beside their cattle pen. According to Nuru, the cows have helped them drastically improve their standard of living over the past four years.

Hasan Mkitage’s brother, Saidi Abdullah Mkitage, and his wife, Asia Halifa, also received a cow through PWRDF. Here they pose with their daughter Latifa next to the cattle pen.

Mkitage’s and Salifa’s cow is curious about all the attention.

Delegates gather around Kassian Makarmsi’s goat hutch to learn about how goat’s milk can help those suffering from HIV/AIDS. Makarmsi (in the purple shirt) is able to get sufficient nutrients from the milk to take the anti-retroviral drugs that allow him to stay healthy, and makes a profit from the remainder.

Msham Salumu (left) and Emmanuel Mwachiko (right), livestock officer for the PWRDF programs in Nanganga region, wrestle Begum the billy goat out of his hutch. Salumu received Begum and a female goat, Mary, through a PWRDF program in 2016.

Fresh-laid eggs rest atop sacks of grain in Nanganga village.

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