Opinion

Thank you

On June 25, 2007, I was installed as the 13th primate of our beloved church. It was a hot and humid night, and St. Matthew’s Church in Winnipeg was like a sauna! I was so overwhelmed with the responsibilities of the ministry to which I had been called, I remember little of the liturgy except the great relief of the congregation in being sprinkled with water as we renewed our vows in baptism! While momentary, the relief was welcomed!

A grateful moment for ecumenical leadership

National Lutheran Bishop Susan Johnson and Anglican Primate Fred Hiltz will complete their ministry together as leaders in partnership of their respective churches this...

On the marriage canon

When non-Indigenous people hear that there is a widespread ambivalence and reluctance among Indigenous Anglicans to change the marriage canon to allow same-sex marriage,...
Roses

Where are all our flowers going?

The widespread murder and disappearance of Indigenous women and girls in Canada calls us to value them differently—before they’re all gone—argues Ginny Doctor.

Finding unity through the Spirit

As General Synod approaches, scripture shows us we can speak the same language—even if we’re not of the same mind. The feast of Pentecost is...

A call to discipleship

This column has often had the theme of decolonization and the process of becoming a post-colonial church, though only rarely naming it that directly. It is a...

Serving the common good

I’m excited about a new ministry prospect that is becoming available to the citizens of my city. We Christians have an opportunity to work...

‘Pressing on’

That is an image that comes to mind as I think of our church’s efforts to become post-colonial. It speaks of a journey. As Indigenous...

Is the Anglican Church of Canada a post-colonial church?

The experience of new Canadians helps separate myth from reality. “Pour out your Spirit upon the whole earth and make it your new creation. Gather...

When God settles the waters

Before moving to Canada, I lived in Rochester, New York, where I worshipped at a Lutheran-Episcopal church plant. The congregation, which sat in a circle, began every service with a simple chant from Psalm 46: “Be still and know that I am God.” The chant served as a reminder, before the start of worship, that God was in the building: whatever our worries and trials from the previous week, God would be there to hear and hold them. The Lord of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge.

Finches and Falcons

A hopeful sign of spring occurs when house finches and prairie falcons appear near our northwest Calgary home, as they did in March. Nature gives...

‘The eyes of our faith’

O God, Your Son made himself known to his disciples In the breaking of bread. Open the eyes of our faith, That we may see him in his...

Easter eyes: life in the midst of spiritual crisis

When, on Friday, at the cross, the centurion gasps, “Truly this man was God’s Son,” he is not only telling us what his heart says about Jesus.

Sacrificial love

Jesus, in his life, death and resurrection, is the centre point of Creation and history.

Leadership and the rest of us

In the past few years, we have chosen many new bishops. Soon, we will choose a new primate. With these major changes, we have...