Features

Are ‘thoughts and prayers’ enough? Some Anglicans reflect

There’s value in praying to effect change—but if our prayers don’t affect our actions, something might be amiss, some Canadian Anglicans say. Since the mass...

What is prayer, and why do we pray?

Photo: A3PF Family/Shutterstock Some people, if asked, would probably 
say that prayer means asking for something, and indeed the Oxford Canadian Dictionary defines prayer as...

A gentle invitation to worship

As people enter through the narthex of St. Faith’s Anglican Church, Vancouver, B.C., on a Sunday evening, they are greeted by a small table...
For the past seven years, artist Karen Brodie has worked on banner designs that ask worshippers to move beyond memorizing the story line around Christ's last days. Photo: David Cooper

A faith journey through art

Sit, reflect and pray.

God is on the side of the oppressed’

In the wake of racial unrest and recent police violence in America, the Rev. Kelly Brown Douglas wrote her latest book with "the crying...
Children in wedding ceremonies bring joy - and sometimes, unintended consequences. Photo: GDRayson

Some weddings more ‘special’ than others, priests say

Every wedding is special, priests will tell you-but when things don't go as planned, some are more "special" than others.

Including children and dogs in a ceremony, frequently requested these days, can lead to unintended consequences, says Canon Judy Rois, executive director of the Anglican Foundation of Canada, and a parish priest for some 30 years.

Mental illness is now the domain of science. Is there still a role for faith? Image: Mouki K. Butt/moukikbutt.com

Solace for the soul

Religion, say some mental health experts, has at times been a mixed blessing for people of faith struggling with mental illness-but the picture is changing, bringing new hope for the afflicted.

Out of the shadows and into the light

Soon after The Rev. Claire Miller arrived at her new parish of St. Thomas Anglican Church in Owen Sound, Ont., she complained to a parishioner about feeling drained. Now, years later, she still remembers his response.

Lorie Lee-Knight wrote to her parents from Athens, Greece, where she was studying architecture: “I’m having the time of my life.” Photo: Contributed

Writing of love and loss

There are no measures of the depths of grief, but the death of a child is often said to be one of the most traumatic kinds of losses that people endure.
Kenton Lobe and Caroline Chartrand harvest their hand-pollinated squashes. Photo: Contributed

Gearing down in an age of speed

In the modern world, most of us live highly specialized lives. We generally assume that it is more efficient to trade our time for pay and then to pay other people for their time rather than doing things like growing food and making clothes ourselves.
As he celebrates his 20th year as Country Guide columnist, Bishop Rodney Andrews remembers that he only ever wanted to be an Anglican priest. And a pilot. Photo: Dave Stobbe

The flying bishop

Rod Andrews knows what it is to be forever connected to a chunk of land and a way of life. There's a special quality in his voice when he talks about the family farm, on Alberta's Coal Trail between Delburne and Red Deer.
The Gusdal-Kiyooka family (l to r): Siri, Jeff, Hanae and Emi. Photo: Contributed

Living a richer life with less

Edmonton doctor Jeff Gusdal says that he recently calculated that he and his wife, Hanae Kiyooka, could have been among the "one percenters," the wealthiest segment of the world's population.

Newfoundlanders still see church as part of their identity

The diocese of Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador is a place of contrasts. In its centre, St. John's, wealthy property developers rub shoulders with fishermen and oil workers just back from Alberta's Fort McMurray. In its farthest-flung regions, priests drive for hours to visit remote parishes in Labrador.

These contrasts are present, too, in the life of the church.

Creativity in thrall to moral nihilism

The five novels (at least two more are planned) that comprise George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series defied conventional cinematic adaptation: with numerous characters, far-flung locations (everything from deserts to great cities to a wintry wasteland) and complex plots, each of the books was too involved to fit within the confines of even a long movie.

A powerful lesson in Christmas

It was 8 p.m. on December 22, the day after Toronto's catastrophic 2013 ice storm.