March 30, 2017 Log In


  • 1 Hope and faith in a troubled land
    1 Hope and faith in a troubled land
  • 2 Why Jerusalem Sunday?
    2 Why Jerusalem Sunday?
  • 3 Land of the living stones
  • 4 Primate’s prayer for Jerusalem
  • 5 Tourist or pilgrim: it's up to you
  • 6 By the numbers
  • 7 The door is wide open
  • 1 Hope and faith in a troubled land
  • 2 Why Jerusalem Sunday?
  • 3 Land of the living stones
  • 4 Primate’s prayer for Jerusalem
  • 5 Tourist or pilgrim: it's up to you
  • 6 By the numbers
  • 7 The door is wide open

From Feb. 6 to 13, Anglican Video's senior producer, Lisa Barry, visited the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem. Barry kept a diary in which she shared not only the events of the day but insights gained from meeting the "living stones,” the people of the Holy Land who live their faith on the ground, where it matters most. Read Lisa's diary


Peace and Justice Issues in the Middle East


Jerusalem Video Diaries


RESOURCES: Videos & Documentaries


RESOURCES: Book List

Click here for suggested readings.

 


RESOURCES: Web Links

Click here for a sampling of on-line resources that document Christian responses to the conflict in the Middle East.

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List of articles

  • Tourist or pilgrim: it's up to you

    Tourist or pilgrim: it's up to you

    I used to live in Jerusalem. I lived there with my wife and our children in in the 1990s when I served with St. George’s College as the director of their Desert Program. 


  • Timeline of the Middle East conflict

    Timeline of the Middle East conflict
    The land between the Jordan River and the eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea, which both Palestinians and Israelis claim, has been settled, resettled, conquered and reconquered throughout history, as far back as biblical times.

  • Primate’s prayer for Jerusalem

    Primate’s prayer for Jerusalem

    If prayer is “a gathering into the heart,” as former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams put it, and “a longing of the soul,” as Mahatma Gandhi said, a special prayer recently composed by the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada expresses both intentions.



  • Five films

    Five films
    A sampling of best films/documentaries that shed light on the Middle East conflict

  • Land of the Living Stones

    Land of the Living Stones
    From Feb. 6 to 13, 2014, Anglican Video's senior producer, Lisa Barry visited the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, along with the Anglican Church of Canada's global relations director, Andrea Mann, Anglican Video's production manager, Becky Boucher, and Scott Brown, a freelance cameraman.

  • By the numbers

    By the numbers
    0.6 per cent of the world’s 2.2 billion Christians live in the Middle East and North Africa; they make up 4 per cent of the region’s total population, down 20 per cent from a century ago

  • Why Jerusalem Sunday?

    Why Jerusalem Sunday?

    On June 1, Canadian Anglicans will observe Jerusalem Sunday for the first time. 


  • Hope and faith in a troubled land

    Hope and faith in a troubled land

    “Does the world care that we’re being pushed out of our land and that we have nowhere to go?” Palestinian Christians posed this haunting question over and over to Lisa Barry, Anglican Video’s senior producer, by Palestinian Christians during a February trip to the Holy Land.


     

     


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About the project

The Anglican Church of Canada and the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem have been companions in mission for many years, yet not much is known about this relationship.

Each year, numerous Canadians visit the Holy Land as pilgrims, students and tourists, yet many know little of the life and witness of Christians there—be they Palestinian, Arab Israeli, Jordanian, Lebanese or Syrian.

There is much to see, hear, experience and learn about being Anglican, being Christian in this ancient, troubled place today.

Journey to Jerusalem Sunday—a multimedia web page produced by the Anglican Journal and Anglican Video—intends to make the people and stories of Anglicans in the Holy Land come alive in word, image and sound. We hope it will contribute to a greater understanding of how the ancestors of the first indigenous Christian community—“the living stones”—are living out their faith despite continuing social, political and economic hardships. 


 


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